Addiction Policy News

CDC and FDA Recommend That People Should Not Use THC-containing E-cigarette, or Vaping, Products

December 16, 2019

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  state and local health departments, and other clinical and public health partners are investigating a national outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI). As of December 10, 2019, a total of 2,409 hospitalized EVALI cases have been reported to CDC from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands). Fifty-two deaths have been confirmed in 26 states and the District of Columbia.

The latest national and state data from patient reports and product sample testing suggest THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly from informal sources like friends, family, or in-person or online dealers, are linked to most of the cases and play a major role in the outbreak. While it appears that vitamin E acetate is associated with EVALI, there are many different substances and product sources that are being investigated, and there may be more than one cause. CDC and FDA recommend that people should not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly from informal sources like friends, family, or in-person or online sellers.

CDC has analyzed national data on use of THC-containing product brands by e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) patients. 

  • Overall, 152 different THC-containing product brands were reported by EVALI patients.
  • Dank Vapes, a class of largely counterfeit THC-containing products of unknown origin, was the most commonly reported product brand used by patients nationwide, although there are regional differences. While Dank Vapes was most commonly reported in the Northeast and South, TKO and Smart Cart brands were more commonly reported by patients in the West and Rove was more common in the Midwest.
  • The data further support that EVALI is associated with THC-containing products and that it is not likely associated with a single THC-containing product brand.

For the latest information, refer to the CDC's website here.