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ASAM Policy Principles

ASAM believes in a future in which addiction prevention, treatment, remission, and recovery are accessible to all, and where they profoundly improve the health of all people.  The following principles guide our advocacy and shape ASAM's advocacy priorities:
  • Addiction policy should be guided by - and promote the use of - the latest science and best practices in addiction prevention, treatment, remission, and recovery.  People with addiction deserve compassionate, evidence-based care that addresses the chronic nature of the disease of addiction.
  • Strategic and multifaceted policy solutions are needed to drive the development of a more accessible, effective, robust, and comprehensive addiction prevention and treatment infrastructure.
  • Policies and payment systems should ensure equitable access to comprehensive, high-quality addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery services.
  • Policy should challenge, rather than enforce, cultural misunderstanding, stigma and discrimination about the disease of addiction.
  • Addiction policy and advocacy should respect and integrate the perspectives of people with addiction and their families.



 A Voice for Addiction Medicine


Leading the movement to transform America's addiction treatment infrastructure and expand access to research-validated, results-based care

 


Federal Advocacy Priorities

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TEACH addiction medicine by expanding and strengthening our workforce and dispelling stigma
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STANDARDIZE the delivery of individualized addiction treatment so that more patients receive high-quality, evidence-based care
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COVER addiction medicine in a way that expands patient access to comprehensive, high-quality addiction care
 
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State Chapter Advocacy Highlights

Guiding Cannabis Conversations

Increasing Enforcement of Mental Health and Addiction Parity

Reducing Harms Related to Drug Use and Punitive Drug Policies



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Advocacy Committees & Councils

ASAM's advocacy could not happen if not for the dedicated effort of our members.

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Public Policy Statements

Learn about ASAM's position on current policy issues.

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Coalitions

ASAM is proud to work collaboratively with others to improve the lives of those living with addiction.
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Advocacy Toolkits

ASAM provides toolkits to help you advocate for public policies that advance addiction medicine and promote access to treatment


 
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CDC and FDA Recommend That People Should Not Use THC-containing E-cigarette, or Vaping, Products

by | Dec 16, 2019

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  state and local health departments, and other clinical and public health partners are investigating a national outbreak of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI). As of December 10, 2019, a total of 2,409 hospitalized EVALI cases have been reported to CDC from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands). Fifty-two deaths have been confirmed in 26 states and the District of Columbia.

The latest national and state data from patient reports and product sample testing suggest THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly from informal sources like friends, family, or in-person or online dealers, are linked to most of the cases and play a major role in the outbreak. While it appears that vitamin E acetate is associated with EVALI, there are many different substances and product sources that are being investigated, and there may be more than one cause. CDC and FDA recommend that people should not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly from informal sources like friends, family, or in-person or online sellers.

CDC has analyzed national data on use of THC-containing product brands by e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) patients. 

  • Overall, 152 different THC-containing product brands were reported by EVALI patients.
  • Dank Vapes, a class of largely counterfeit THC-containing products of unknown origin, was the most commonly reported product brand used by patients nationwide, although there are regional differences. While Dank Vapes was most commonly reported in the Northeast and South, TKO and Smart Cart brands were more commonly reported by patients in the West and Rove was more common in the Midwest.
  • The data further support that EVALI is associated with THC-containing products and that it is not likely associated with a single THC-containing product brand.

For the latest information, refer to the CDC's website here.