American Society of Addiciton Medicine

Board of Directors

Leadership

Board of Directors

Michael F. Weaver, MD, DFASAM

Director At Large


Michael Weaver, MD, DFASAM is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addictions (CNRA) at the McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston).

He received his M.D. degree from Northeast Ohio Medical University and completed Residency in Internal Medicine and a Clinical Research Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Health System. He is Board-certified in Internal Medicine through the American Board of Internal Medicine and certified in Addiction Medicine through the American Board of Preventive Medicine.

Dr. Weaver is the Sub-Board Chair for Addiction Medicine on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and also serves as the Chair of the Examination Committee for certification in Addiction Medicine. He has been a member of ASAM for over 25 years and currently serves as a member of the Annual Conference Program Planning Committee. He is currently involved in patient care, medical education, and research.

Dr. Weaver sees patients in the Innovations Addiction Treatment Clinic at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. He has extensive experience teaching about addiction to medical students, residents, and community professionals at all levels. He has been involved in multiple research projects, and currently is collaborating with other researchers in the CNRA on studies involving cocaine, cannabis, alcohol, and electronic cigarettes. Dr. Weaver has multiple publications in the field of addiction medicine, including the book "Addiction Treatment" published by Carlat Publishing in 2017.

 

Candidate Questionnaire Responses

1.What have been your greatest contributions to ASAM or to the field of addiction medicine over the last 10 years?
I have been a member of ASAM since 1994. I became a Fellow of ASAM in 2003 and a Distinguished Fellow in 2015. I was certified in Addiction Medicine by ASAM in 1998, then certified in Addiction Medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) as soon as it was possible in 2009, and I became certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine as soon as that was possible in 2018.

My contributions to ASAM and the field of Addiction Medicine are through my service in leadership roles for physicians to become certified in Addiction Medicine over the past 20 years. As the Chair of the ASAM Examination Committee that oversees the initial certification exam, I helped facilitate the exam administration change from paper-and-pencil to computerized testing at secure testing centers, as well as development of a new Blueprint for the exam content. When the certification process transitioned to ABAM, I continued as the Chair of the Examination Committee and worked on Maintenance of Certification procedures and activities. When the certification process was taken over by the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM), I continued as the Chair of the Examination Committee and expanded this leadership role by becoming the Sub-Board Chair for Addiction Medicine for the ABPM. In this role, I have participated in multiple advancements for the field. I oversee the initial certification process under ABMS as a recognized subspecialty within the House of Medicine, including leading the development of the Practice Pathway for physicians practicing Addiction Medicine to become certified through ABPM with a streamlined application process for those certified by ABAM. In 2019, I became a full member of the ABPM Board of Directors, giving the field of Addiction Medicine a seat at the table and a recognized voice in the House of Medicine.

I have been a member of the ASAM Publications Council from 2011 to 2021. I joined the Annual Conference Planning Committee in 2016 and I continue working on that committee. I have been a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since its inception in 2006, including authoring the very first review article published in the first issue of the journal. I was one of the co-editors of the ASAM Handbook of Pain and Addiction published in 2018. I also contributed to the ASAM Guideline on Alcohol Withdrawal Management that was published in 2019, and most recently I contributed to the ASAM Guideline on Tobacco Cessation in Addiction Treatment published in January 2022.

2. How would your election to the ASAM Board of Directors benefit ASAM and the field of addiction medicine?
I am applying for a position as a Director-At-Large on the ASAM Board of Directors because I want to continue to serve ASAM in a leadership role. I have been involved with ASAM for 28 years and it is by far my favorite professional organization. I have made many contacts through ASAM that have become friends as well as colleagues. ASAM has profoundly influenced my growth in the field of Addiction Medicine and provided me with opportunities for service and to make a difference in my chosen field.

Becoming a member of the ASAM Board of Directors would benefit ASAM because of my role as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) representing Addiction Medicine. I would be a direct liaison between ASAM and the ABPM for even more cooperation between these two important organizations that oversee complementary aspects of the field. This will be especially important as the ABPM Continuing Certification Program (CCP, formerly Maintenance of Certification) is developed. Much of the membership of ASAM is certified by ABPM and will need to participate in the CCP to maintain that subspecialty certification, and I am playing a key role in developing and administrating the CCP. I am involved in development of the Longitudinal Assessment Program (LAP) for the CCP that is replacing the high-stakes 10-year re-certification exam, and I can provide information for ASAM members who are ABPM diplomates about this.

I have other abilities that can contribute to the ASAM Board. Dissemination of research findings for formulation of new clinical practice strategies is essential to help patients benefit from advances in scientific knowledge. I have taught and published about translational aspects of research findings to help clinicians incorporate the new findings into routine care for patients. My focus has been on assessment for addiction and ways for clinicians to appropriately address this with their patients. As an academic clinical researcher and practicing clinician, I can contribute insights into the interface of research and patient care. This is exemplified by my multiple contributions to ASAM publications, including the ASAM Handbook of Pain and Addiction, and multiple articles to the Journal of Addiction Medicine since its inception. Another skill that I can contribute to the ASAM Board is teaching. I have been involved in teaching throughout my career and given multiple well-attended presentations at many ASAM Annual Conferences. I want to be able to give back to ASAM by joining the Board of Directors in order to contribute my own skills and abilities to this amazing organization.