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Ask the PCSS Expert: Counseling Requirements in Addiction Treatment?


A physician wrote the PCSS mentor network seeking advice on what type of counseling (group/individual/ AA, NA/ therapist) are typically required as part of addiction treatment.

 

neurons


Brain Stimulation as a Potential Treatment for Addiction

 

Brain stimulation has been in use for decades as a potential treatment for psychiatric disorders. However, its use in addiction is relatively new.




Breaking News

Education & Training

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Government Affairs

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Your ASAM

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

OP-ED

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.