Features

trans-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol

Selective Inhibition Shows Promise as Marijuana Treatment
Diana Martinez, MD and Pierre Trifilieff, PhD

A promising treatment option for addiction to marijuana may emerge through selective inhibition of a specific signaling pathway in the brain.





Medicaid Coverage Map

State Medicaid Coverage of Addiction Treatment in the US
Beth Haynes

To help further knowledge of current care coverage, ASAM has produced two-page state fact sheets that summarize Medicaid coverage of both medication and counseling addiction treatment.

Breaking News

  • 9/26/2014

    DEA Reschedules Hydrocodone Combination Products

    On August 22nd, the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) formally rescheduled hydrocodone combination products (HCPs), moving them from Schedule III to Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act.

Education & Training

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.
       

Government Affairs

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.
       

Your ASAM

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.
       

OP-ED

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Primary Care Interventions

by Magazine Staff | Mar 13, 2014

On March 10th, the Task Force published a final recommendation statement on primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. The statement claims that "the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care–based behavioral interventions." To support the recommendations, the Task Force also posted an evidence report which summarizes the studies the Task Force reviewed. Along with the final recommendation statement and evidence report, the Task Force also released a fact sheet that explains the final recommendation in plain language.

ASAM submitted comments which expressed concerns about unintended consequences that may result from the Task Force’s recommendations. ASAM is concerned that the recommendation may dissuade willing primary care providers from screening for substance use disorders since there is “insufficient” data to support the benefits of brief intervention, which could include referral to treatment. For most children and teenagers, their only health care intervention may be an annual visit with their pediatrician or other primary care provider. A simple, one-question query about their use of licit or illicit substances can have its own positive effects on a patient’s self-awareness and the relation of health to their substance use.

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.