Education

Main Program

Speakers, times, and topics subject to change without notice.

2012 ASAM Med-Sci Program Final


  • Tuesday, April 17, 2012

    3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Finance Committee Meeting
    Room 203, Second Floor
    6:00 pm - 9:00 pm Board of Directors Meeting
    Rooms 212-214, Second Floor 

     


  • Wednesday, April 18, 2012

    8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Board of Directors Meeting
    Grand Salon East - Salon AB, Second Floor
    5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
    Registration Open
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor
    10:00 pm - 11:00 pm
    Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor

     


  • Thursday, April 19, 2012

    7:00 am - 8:00 am Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor 
    7:00 am - 8:00 pm Registration Open 
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor
    8:00 am - 8:30 am
    NIDA Blending Registration Open
    Grand Ballroom East - Ballroom AB Foyer, Second Floor
    8:00 am - 5:30 pm
    Ruth Fox Course for Physicians: Improving the Health of Women
    Grand Salon West - Salons DE, Second Floor
    8:00 am - 5:30 pm
    Pain & Addiction: Common Threads XIII - Healing the Healer
    Grand Salon East - Salons A-C, Second Floor
    8:30 am - 5:00 pm
    NIDA Blending Initiative Knowledge Exchange Meeting 
    Grand Ballroom East - Ballroom AB, Second Floor
    12:00 pm - 2:00 pm JAM Editorial Board Meeting
    Room 206, Second Floor
    2:30 pm - 5:00 pm Publications Council Meeting
    Room 206, Second Floor 
    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm New Members Welcome Reception 
    Crystal Ballroom CD, Lobby Level
    5:15 pm - 7:00 pm Virginia, Maryland and DC Chapter Meeting
    Offiste (location TBD)
    5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Ruth Fox Endowment Scholarship Meeting
    Room 214, Second Floor

    Public Policy Committee
    Room 204, Second Floor
    Women & Substance Use Disorders Action Group
    Room 205, Second Floor
    Twelve Step Recovery Action Workshop
    Room 206, Second Floor
    5:30 pm - 7:00 pm California Chapter Meeting
    Room 405, Fourth Floor
    6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Welcome Reception and Exhibit Hall Opens 
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Pain and Addicition Course Planning Committee
    Room 213, Second Floor
    7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    State Chapters Council & Membership Committee Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor              
    Ruth Fox Course Planning Committee
    Room 207, Second Floor

    8:00 pm - 10:00 pm - Concurrent Sessions  

    Component Session I - Room 301, Third Floor
    The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM), and The ABAM Foundation: The Development and Accreditation of Addiction Medicine Residency Training Programs, and the Recognition of Addiction Medicine as a Medical Specialty by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)

    Speakers: Richard D. Blondell, MD; Kevin Kunz, MD, MPH, DFASAM; Hoover Adger, Jr., MD, MPH, MBA

    Description: This component session provides brief presentations on the evaluation and accreditation of residency training programs in Addiction Medicine and ABAM's progress toward ABMS recognition, with time in each segment for participants to pose questions on issues that are important to them.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will understand:

    The ABAM Foundation has set standards for the accreditation of addiction medicine training Programs, and the accreditation of training programs mark a critical milestone toward the goal of achieving addiction medicines recognition by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Medical Specialties, and formal recognition of the discipline of addiction medicine by organized medicine. Participants will gain an understanding of: The ABAM and The ABAM Foundation missions and governance. 

    1. Understanding of The addiction medicine residency  Program Requirements, Core Content, Curriculum Objectives, and Program Accreditation Application Forms.
    2. Understanding of ABAM Foundations Accreditation Application Process.
    3. Understanding of Funding for Accredited programs: current and future programs and The Foundations future plans for setting standards and the accreditation of Addiction Medicine residency training programs.
    4. Understanding of What ABAM has done and what its plans are to engage in dialogue with the ABMS member boards to gain their support for ABMS and ACGME recognition of addiction medicine.

    Component Session 2 - Room 302, Third Floor
    Moving Addiction Medicine into Primary Care

    Speakers: Norman W. Wetterau, MD, FAAP, DFASAM; James Finch, MD

    Session Description: This component session is an open discussion by primary care physicians who are attending this ASAM meeting.  The session will be led by two family physicians who have been leaders in the integration of addiction medicine into primary care. They will briefly present updates on a number of issues but the bulk of the session will be questions and discussion by those present on the listed issues or other issues they feel are important.

    Specific issues to be discussed include:

    1. ASAMs involvement in the patient centered medical home  
    2. Requirements for addressing SUD in the NCQA Patient centered medical home certification process  
    3. Primary care physicians and prescription drug abuse  
    4. STFM addiction group: what are they doing to promote addiction medicine in family practice 
    5. Changes in ABFM and AAFP that might promote addiction treatment in family practice
    6. Promotion of addiction within primary care at the state and level
    7. How can ASAM help promote Addiction Medicine in primary care?

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Understand how ASAM is involved in making sure substance use disorders are addressed in patient centered medical homes and how they can be involved
    2. Learn what others are doing in their state chapters to help reduce prescription drug abuse in their state
    3. Learn how ASAM works through STFM and primary care boards to promote addiction medicine

    Component Session 3 - Room 303, Third Floor
    Youth Opioid Dependence -- Child and Adolescent Workgroup

    Speakers: Marc Fishman, MD, DFASAM; Geetha Subramaniam, MD; Joseph Lee, MD

    Description: The field is confronting an alarming national epidemic in youth opioid use, both prescription medications and heroin. Parents are bewildered and understandably frightened. Practitioners are frustrated, without clear direction or a sense of best practices for treatment beyond detoxification. This Adolescent Committee Component Session will feature a panel on the state of the field in youth opioid treatment. Brief introductory presentations by panel members will be followed by Q&A and an interactive discussion with the audience. Topics will include the role of relapse prevention medications including buprenorphine and extended release naltrexone, pros and cons of agonist medications including risks of misuse and diversion, the role of residential level of care, the role of continuing care and the need for longer term monitoring and engagement, the adequacy of the current community treatment delivery system, the role of the 12-step fellowship, and others. We will attempt to articulate knowledge and practice gaps, and outline an agenda for the future directions for the field.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Discuss the pros and cons of integrated medication and counseling treatment for youth opioid addiction
    2. Identify the relative merits and liabilities of various current practice approached to youth opioid dependence
    3. Articulate knowledge and practice gaps, and outline an agenda for the future directions in the field

    Component Session 4 - Room 304, Third Floor
    Addiction is Addiction: Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual Assessment and Treatment

    Speakers: Raju Hajela, MD, MPH, DFASAM; Sue Newton, RN, BA, BScN, MN

    Description: The new ASAM definition of Addiction approved in 2011 now recognizes a unitary view of addiction as a primary, chronic brain disease, which is biological, psychological, social and spiritual in its manifestations.  Hence, practitioners need to increase their expertise in a more comprehensive assessment and treatment model that incorporates the chronic disease management concepts and tailors the treatment to individuals and families.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Learn the key aspects of the new ASAM definition of Addiction that reflect an advance in terms of a unitary, holistic view of this brain disease.
    2. Appreciate the critical aspects of assessment and treatment in the biological, psychological, social and spiritual framework to better assist patients and families  recovery.
    3. Learn specific aspects of cognitive and affective distortions that need to be challenged in individual and group psychotherapy.
    4. Appreciate the role of mutual support meetings and peer support networks in developing social aspects of recovery.

    10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor

     


  • Friday, April 20, 2012

    7:00 am - 8:00 am
    Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor
    7:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Registration Open
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor
    7:30 am - 9:00 am
    Annual Business Meeting & Breakfast
    (ASAM Members only - breakfast service will start at 7:15 am)
    Grand Ballroom West - Ballroom CD, Second Floor 
    9:00 am - 10:30 am

    Opening Scientific Plenary & the R. Brinkley Smithers Distinguished Scientist Award and Lecture

    Grand Ballroom East - Ballroom AB, Second Floor

    Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM

    "Screening and Brief Intervention for Unhealthy Alcohol and Other Drug Use: Where the Evidence is...and isn't"

     

    Wilson M. Compton, MD, MPE, National Institute on Drug Abuse

    Peter J. Delany, PhD, LCSW-C, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration

    Kenneth R. Warren, PhD, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    10:00 am - 6:00 pm  Exhibit Hall Open
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    10:30 am - 11:00 am  Refreshment Break - Exhibit Hall
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level              
    10:30 am - 11:30 am Georgia Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor

    11:00 am - 1:00 pm - Concurrent Sessions

    Symposium 1 - Grand Salon East - Salon C, Second Floor
    Addiction and the Criminal Justice System: Special Topics 

    Speakers: Greg Bunt, MD; Mel Pohl, MD DFASAM; Shelley Listwan, PhD; Wilson Compton, MD; Kevin Kunz, MD, MPH, DFASAM

    Description: Addressing the problem of identifying and treating addictions in the population of those within the criminal justice system is a subject of major public importance, and should be paramount to addiction professionals.  There are a number of successful models of treatment alternatives to incarceration or other criminal sanctions that have demonstrated efficacy and favorable outcomes. Among these are specialized drug courts, and some of these models will be presented and described. Furthermore, established research in the area of the treatment of addicted individuals in the criminal justice system has illuminated a number of key clinical principles that can be applied by practitioners.

    Addiction physicians will be apprised of new developments in this vitally important area of treating addictions in the population of those within the criminal justice system. NIDA supported research in this area outlines principles that can be applied by practitioners.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Addiction physicians will become familiar with the legal issues and mandates regarding the addicted population within the criminal justice system.
    2. Physicians will learn about treatment approaches involving enhanced motivational methods in alignment with criminal justice systems.
    3. Physicians will learn about integrating treatment approaches with this challenging population.

    Symposium 2 - Grand Salon West - Salon D, Second Floor
    Update on Medications for Alcohol Use Disorders and Their Implementation in Practice
    Sponsored by: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

    Organizers: 
    Kenneth Warren, PhD
    Acting Director, NIAAA
    Welcome and Opening Remarks

    Robert Huebner, PhD
    Acting Director, NIAAA Division of Treatment and Recovery Research
    Overview of NIAAA Symposium

    Speakers: 
    Bankole Johnson, DSc, MD, PhD, MPhil, FRCPsych
    Why and How Medicines Should Be Used to Treat Alcoholism

    Alexander H. Harris, PhD
    Pharmacotherapy for Addiction: Possible Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Greater Adoption

    Amanda Abraham, PhD
    Availability of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUSDs): Data from US Specialty Treatment Systems

    Description: The primary goal of this symposium is to provide ASAM physicians with an update on medications to treat alcohol dependence, discuss new alcohol medications in the pipeline, and identify barriers that prevent the use of alcohol medications and ways to enhance their use in real-world treatment settings. In addition, an overview will be presented on the availability of alcohol medications in health plans appropriate for specialty and primary care settings.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Learn which alcohol medications are currently in the pipeline.
    2. Learn how to recognize barriers to alcohol medications use in real world settings.
    3. Learn about strategies that can be utilized to enhance adoption of alcohol medication use.
    4. Learn how alcohol medications are used in health plans of both specialty and primary care settings.
    5. Learn how to use Guidelines for FDA-approved medications targeting alcohol disorders.

    Course 1 - Rooms 208-209, Second Floor
    Models of Medicalization of Addiction Treatment

    Speakers:  Michael M. Miller, MD, DFASAM, FAPA (Mary Jo Wiegratz will speak on behalf of Dr. Miller); A. Kenison Roy, III, MD, DFASAM; David E. Smith, MD, DFASAM

    Description: The Wellstone-Domenici legislation and subsequent rulemaking, followed by the healthcare reform bill has predicted changes in how addiction treatment will be provided.  This course will describe several real-world examples of enhanced medical participation in and direction of ongoing addiction treatment.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Be exposed to real-world examples of the effects of parity efforts in the direction of medicalization of addiction treatment
    2. Be encouraged to develop increased medical involvement in their own environment. 
    3. Recognize the ways that both the private sector and public, both large and small efforts can participate in medically influenced addiction treatment.

    Course 2 - Rooms 210-211, Second Floor
    My Kid is Using WHAT? Treatment for Opioid Dependence in Youth

    Speakers: Marc Fishman, MD, DFASAM; Sharon Levy, MD, MPH; Ann Bruner, MD

    Description: The epidemic of opioid dependence is a growing public health problem with devastating consequences for youth and their families. Recent findings have supported combining medications (both buprenorphine and extended release naltrexone) with psychosocial interventions. This session will highlight innovative program development, clinical experience, and outcome data at two treatment centers, and provide practical treatment guidance for clinicians. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Learn about the benefits of integrated medication and counseling treatment for youth opioid addiction.
    2. Recognize facilitators and barriers to practical implementation of relapse prevention medication for youth.
    3. Appreciate the salience of a longitudinal engagement and medical management approach to the treatment of youth opioid addiction.

    Course 3 - Rooms 204-205, Second Floor

    Making Advances: Results of Women's Sexuality Survey & Its Impact on Assessment and Treatment for Female Sex and Love Addicts

    Speaker: M. Deborah Corley, PhD

    Description:  This course reviews the results of the Women’s Sexuality Survey conducted in 2009-2010, comparing the responses of self-identified female sex addicted and self-identified love addicts with non-addict women regarding their sexual behaviors, thoughts, feelings, and consequences. Significant differences were shown utilizing subscales for hypersexual disorder criteria examining specific scores on loss of control, coping, and consequences with the addicted groups scoring significantly higher than non-addicted group. Risk factors such as childhood sexual abuse and exposure to pornography were identified. Addict groups scored significantly higher than the non-addict group on specific subscales including medical consequences (attempted suicide, alcohol and other drug use, unintended pregnancy, termination of unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, and fertility problems), putting self in harm’s way, impact of the Internet/cybersex, level of shame, and the need for affirmation. Frequency of offending behaviors will also be reviewed.      

    An overview of the impact of the results of the study both on assessment and treatment of female sex and love addicts will be discussed. Copies of various assessment instruments with adequate psychometrics will be reviewed and specific questions highlighting the differences between male and female sex and love addicts and the context of women’s lives (level of burden) will be offered. Recommendations for what women seek in therapy and the merit of group versus individual approaches will be discussed.    

    Women who appear with symptoms related to hypersexual behavior disorder identify themselves as love addicts more often than as female sex addicts. Regardless of the label, they meet criteria for hypersexual behavior disorder on three different valid and reliable measures.  Differences with males who have hypersexual disorders, they suffer consequences that reflect medical challenges, putting self in harm’s way including violence in relationships, psychological risk factors including depression and attempted suicide. All these factors influence the assessment process, level of risk and level of care needed, and treatment priorities.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Be able to identify criteria for hypersexual behavior disorder and sexual addiction and will understand how to score three assessment instruments appropriate to use with females presenting with problems associated with sexual behavior.
    2. Be more knowledgeable about the risk factors and consequences of hypersexual behavior for women who present as female sex or love addict. 
    3. Be aware of attachment styles that are associated with female sex addicts versus female love addicts and how to utilize that knowledge in establishing rapport during assessment and treatment.
    4. Be more aware of phase oriented treatment integrated with addiction sensitive models of care for female sex and love addicts.

    Paper Session 1 - Grand Salon East - Salon A, Second Level

    Paper 1 - Perceptions and Use of Medical Marijuana in an Urban Substance Abuse Treatment Program
    Presenter: Charles Shuman, MD 

    Paper 2
    DEA Schedule II and Schedule IV Prescriptions Received by U.S. Active Duty Military Personnel in 2010
    Presenter: Diana D. Jeffery, PhD

    Paper 3
    Patient / Provider Exit Questionnaires
    Presenter: Dan Vinson, MD

    Paper 4
    Comparing the Drinkers Pyramid to Prevalence of At-risk Use and Alcohol Use Disorders in Emergency Department and Urgent Care Settings
    Presenter: J. Aaron Johnson, PhD 


    12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Indiana Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor
    1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
    CME Committee Meeting
    Room 206, Second Floor
    Refreshment Break - Exhibit Hall
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Floor
    1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    Lunch Break
    (on your own)
     
    1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

    Symposium 3 - Grand Salon East - Salon C, Second Floor
    Drug-Drug Interactions: Role of Individualized Medicine
    Sponsored by: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    Organizers: Jag Khalsa, PhD, MS; Judith Martin, MD, DFASAM
    Speakers: Evan Kharasch, MD, PhD; Patrick O’Connor, MD, Zeruesenay Desta, MD

    Description:  There are significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions among recreational drugs and medications used in the treatment of mental disorders and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV and others). These result in significant potential for adverse health consequences.  Research is emerging on pharmacogenomics to show that genomic profile of CYP450s in patients could be used to design therapy for individual patients. However, very few studies have been published or presented on interactions between drugs of abuse (e.g., cocaine, marijuana, opiates, amphetamines, benzodiazepines), agents used to treat substance abuse (e.g., methadone, buprenorphine), and antiretroviral agents.  The proposed symposium will review the state-of-the-art information on this important and emerging issue, and will provide the field directions for future research. The following areas will be covered: (1) the incidence and prevalence of drug-drug interactions; (2) underlying molecular/genetic mechanisms of drug interactions involving drugs of abuse and anti-HIV medications; (3) interactions involving specific agents used in the treatment of drug addiction (methadone, buprenorphine) and mental disorders (e.g., benzodiazepines, SSRI’s); (4) extrapolation/translation of laboratory data to clinical settings; (5) potential adverse consequences of interactions; and finally (6) the role of individualized medicine in treatment. It is anticipated that these discussions would provide directions for future research on the subject.  

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Learn about the nature/extent and clinical consequences of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interactions between illicit drugs and antiretroviral medications in addicted patient
    2. Learn about the interventions used in drug interaction
    3. Learn about the role of interactions in individualized medicine

    1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Principles of Addiction Medicine Editorial Meeting
    Room 207, Second Floor

    2012 Poster Session
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level 

    Poster 11
    Synthetic Stimulants
    Presenter: Thomas Penders, MD

    Poster 12
    Buprenorphine Recipients in Medicare, Private Insurance and Medicaid: A Description of their Clinical and Health Care Utilization
    Presenter: Sandrine Pirard, MD, PhD, MPH

    Poster 13
    Implementation of an electronic information system to enhance practice at an opioid treatment program
    Presenter: Lawrence S. Brown, Jr., MD, MPH, DFASAM

    Poster 14
    Working Inside for Smoking Cessation
    Presenter: Sowole Sonaike

    Poster 15
    Development of a Novel Substance Use Treatment Program
    Presenter: Kathleen Decker, MD

    Poster 16
    Quality of Life Among Healthcare Professionals in Recovery
    Presenter: Lisa Merlo, PhD, MPE

    Poster 17
    Alcohol Withdrawal: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice
    Presenter: Jeffrey Hsu, MD

    Poster 18
    PTSD, Chronic Pain, TBI and Buprenorphine
    Presenter: Adekola Alao, MD, MRCPsych, FAPM; Jamie Vizcarra, DO

    Poster 19
    OBOT (Office Based Opioid Treatment) for the Underserved: Using a Patient-Centered Approach to Treat Addiction in a Community Health Center
    Presenter: Mia Sorcinelli, MD

    Poster 20
    Impact of SBIRT Training on Residents' Attitudes and Behaviors in Delivering Services to At-risk Alcohol Users
    Presenter: Aruna Chhabria, MD

    Poster 21
    Attitudes Towards Buprenorphine Treatment Among Current Heroin Users vs. Non-users in New York City
    Presenter: Pooja Shah

    Poster 22
    The Relationship between Illicit Drug Use and Psychiatric Diagnosis among Pregnant Women
    Presenter: Mishka Terplan, MD, MPH

    Poster 23
    Simple Tool for Determining Degree of Opioid Withdrawal Prior to Buprenorphine Induction
    Presenter: Marilu Vazquez, MD, MS

    Poster 24
    Experiences with Addiction Treatment Referral and Participation among Impaired Healthcare Professionals
    Presenter: Lisa Merlo, PhD, MPE

    Poster 25
    Physician Health Programs, Do Outcomes Change When Controlled Substances Are Prescribed?
    Presenter: Carl Christensen, MD, PhD, DFASAM

    Poster 26
    Adverse Childhood Events and Methamphetamine Use
    Presenter: Kathleen Grant, MD

    Poster 27
    Are The Criteria Compatible? Examining Current DSM-IV and Proposed DSM-V Diagnostic Criteria for Cocaine Use Disorders
    Presenter: Albert Kopak, PhD 

    Poster 28
    Passive Exposure to Opium/Heroin Products in Women and Children of Afghanistan
    Presenter: Amy Poirier, PhD

    Poster 29
    Evaluation of a Web-based SBIRT Training Curriculum for Primary Care Providers: Improving Physicians' Competence in Addiction through Online Training
    Presenter: Bradley Tanner, MD

    Poster 30
    Withdrawn

    Poster 31
    The Medical Consequences of Marijuana Use
    Presenter: Nicholas Pace, MD, DFASAM

    Poster 32
    Physicians Alcoholism and other Addictions Training Program (PAAT): Changing Medical Residents' Perception of Addictive Disease
    Presenter: Nicholas Pace, MD, DFASAM

    Poster 33
    Results of a Six-Month, Randomized, Controlled, Confirmatory Phase 3 Trial Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Buprenorphine Implants to Placebo Implants, and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone for Opioid Addiction

    Presenter: Katherine L. Beebe, PhD


    2:30 pm - 3:00 pm  West Virginia Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor

    2:30 - 4:30 pm

    Symposium 2 (continued) - Grand Salon West - Salon D, Second Floor
    Update on Medications for Alcohol Use Disorders and Their Implementation
    Sponsored by: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

    Speakers: 
    Henry R. Kranzler, MD
    Pharmacotherapy of Alcoholism: Effects on Healthcare Utilization

    Constance M. Horgan, ScD
    Sharon Reif, PhD
    Access to Addiction Pharmacotherapy in Private Health Plans

    Mark L. Willenbring, MD
    Synthesis and Discussion: Medications and Their Use by Physicians

    Raye Z. Litten, PhD                       
    NIAAA's Vision for Medications Development

    Description: The primary goal of this symposium is to provide ASAM physicians with an update on medications to treat alcohol dependence, discuss new alcohol medications in the pipeline, and identify barriers that prevent the use of alcohol medications and ways to enhance their use in real-world treatment settings. In addition, an overview will be presented on the availability of alcohol medications in health plans appropriate for specialty and primary care settings. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Learn which alcohol medications are currently in the pipeline.
    2. Learn how to recognize barriers to alcohol medications use in real world settings.
    3. Learn about strategies that can be utilized to enhance adoption of alcohol medication use.
    4. Learn how alcohol medications are used in health plans of both specialty and primary care settings.
    5. Learn how to use Guidelines for FDA-approved medications targeting alcohol disorders.

    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Tennessee Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor

    3:00 - 5:00 pm - Concurrent Sessions
               

     
    Paper Session 2 - Grand Salon East - Salon A, Second Floor

    Paper 5
    Defeating the Tolerance Problem: Opioid Analgesia without Tolerance or Euphoria
    Presenter: Jeffrey Junig, MD, PhD

    Paper 6
    Nicotine Dependence, Smoking and Opioid Detoxification
    Presenter: Paolo Mannelli, MD

    Paper 7
    A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Long-term Analgesic Effectiveness of 6-months Buprenorphine and Methadone Treatment in Patients with Chronic Non-malignant Pain and Opioid Addiction
    Presenter: Anne Neumann, PhD, MA

    Paper 8
    Bioavailability of Oxymorphone Extended Release 40 mg and Crush-Resistant Oxymorphone Extended Release 40 mg with Ethanol under Fasted Condition
    Presenter: Matthew Wieman, MD

    Paper 9
    Medical Management of Patients Withdrawn from High Dose Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain
    Presenter: Herbert Malinoff, MD, FACP, DFASAM


    Course 4 - Rooms 208-209, Second Floor
    A New Internet-Based Educational and Monitoring Tool for Courts to Use to Enhance Alcohol and Drug Addiction Treatment

    Speaker: Harold Urschel, MD

    Description: For decades now, Corporate EAPs, University addiction prevention and treatment services and the criminal justice system have struggled with having to monitor the progress of abusing/addicted clients within the various prevention/ treatment systems affiliated with a particular EAP/ College Campus/ Court system. Over the last year, an addiction treatment system has been working to implement a series of eLearning (online educational) sessions through www.enterhealth.com, into several types of entities (Healthcare EAPs, large local Universities and DWI/Drug Courts) in Texas. This new technology allows each of these entities to expand access to addiction treatment education and support services into geographic areas where it did not previously reach. Participants in these initiatives use the programming to practice the coping skills necessary for lifelong sobriety both in treatment and in their home environment, while their clinical and operational  team continually monitors their progress in treatment.

    This course will look at the successful integration of the latest scientific educational/monitoring technology which has blended innovative and traditional methods to facilitate long-term healing and recovery for clients and their families.  The course will discuss the first years benefits from several local pilot programs, and also look at broader applications of the technology throughout EAP/health systems, universities and the judicial system.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Learn about an online educational support system that can translate/integrate and reinforce research-based clinical findings into the treatment programs used by their own particular entity/treatment program.
    2. Learn about a new alternative online system that can facilitate monitoring the clinical and administrative progress of their entity’s clients.
    3. Understand the particular benefits, challenges and pitfalls of using this online educational/monitoring system in three different organizations settings in Texas each of which  approach the prevention/ treatment of alcohol and drug addiction from a somewhat different perspective.

    Course 5 - Rooms 210-211, Second Floor
    Leveraging Long-Term Recovery with Contingency Monitoring

    Speakers: Gregory E. Skipper, MD, DFASAM;  Robert DuPont, MD, DFASAM;  Michel A. Sucher, MD, DFASAM;  John Southworth, CADC, BRI II, NAADAC I 

     
    Description: Physician health programs and criminal justice programs have demonstrated the effectiveness of long-term monitoring with contingency agreements. Research in the area of contingency management of addiction has generally been very positive. Despite the evidence showing benefits most patients leave formal addiction treatment without a plan for monitoring. We review what is known about contingency monitoring, the barriers and methods for application.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Become familiar with and be able to discuss concerns and barriers to long-term contingency monitoring.
    2. Explain the evidence that supports the benefits of long-term contingency monitoring.
    3. Describe leverage that can be used to develop contingency monitoring agreements.

    Workshop 1 - Rooms 204-205, Second Floor
    Women and Substance Use: Emerging Research and Clinical Topics
    Sponsored by: ASAM Women and Substance Use Disorders Action Group

    Speakers: Catherine Friedman, MD;  Mishka Terplan, MD, MPH; Tricia E. Wright, MD, MS; Hendree E. Jones, PhD;  Jacqueline Starer, MD, FACOG, DFASAM 

    Description:  Members of ASAM's Women and Substance Use Disorders Action Group will present overviews of contemporary topics of clinical and research interest.  Specific topics are:  1) Reproductive Counseling as a Prevention Tool in Substance Abuse Treatment;  2) Integrating SBIRT into Prenatal Care;  3) Methamphetamine and Pregnancy;  4) Methadone Induction in Pregnancy  Inpatient vs. Outpatient;  5) Methadone and Buprenorphine to Treat Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health -- The Next Stage of MOTHER Findings.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this workshop, attendees will:

    1. Have reviewed how to take a reproductive history and to incorporate reproductive counseling into substance abuse treatment.
    2. Understand the evidence base (and its limitations) regarding SBIRT, the potential benefit of SBIRT in prenatal care, and strategies for overcoming barriers to implementing SBIRT in prenatal clinics.
    3. Understand the socio-behavioral issues that lead to methamphetamine use by women, and the barriers to and possibilities for treatment of methamphetamine use in pregnancy.
    4. Be able to state the pros and cons of inpatient vs. outpatient methadone induction and how both the stage of pregnancy and social factors influence the optimal setting.
    5. Know the comparative effects of exposure to buprenorphine and methadone on fetal movement, cardiac outcomes, and neonatal neurobehavioral effects.

     


    Workshop 2 - Grand Salon East - Salon C, Second Floor
    Medical Literature: Top 10 Addiction Medicine Articles in 2012

    Speakers: Michael Weaver, MD, DFASAM;  John A. Hopper, MD, DFASAM;  Lisa Kutas, MD

    Description: Reading medical literature to remain current in the profession is a daunting task. Using medical literature to answer a clinical question is a necessary skill for practitioners today. However, many practitioners are unfamiliar with how to successfully frame a clinical or research question and search available literature databases to find and answer, including how to determine whether an article used appropriate research methods and reported valid conclusions. Guidelines will be provided to participants to create clinical questions that can be used to begin a search of the medical literature, and how to critique articles based on basic methods to determine whether the article appropriately answers the clinical question. Ten recent articles of exceptional interest to addiction medicine practitioners will be reviewed and critiqued to demonstrate the process and educate participants on the latest research findings in addiction medicine and how this impacts patient care.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this workshop, attendees will:

    1. Frame a clinical question to be answered by searching the medical literature.
    2. Describe ways to determine the relevance of a research or review article.
    3. Discuss the latest research findings in addiction medicine and how this impacts patient care.

    4:00 pm - 6:00 pm ASAM Criteria Editorial Meeting
    Room 207, Second Floor 
    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Region VIII Chapter Meeting (AK, AZ, CO, HI, ID, MT, ND, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY)
    Room 201, Second Floor
    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Ruth Fox Endowment Scholarship Meeting
    Room 214, Second Floor
    5:30 pm - 7:00 pm Medical-Scientific Conference Program Committee
    Room 206, Second Floor 
    6:00 pm  ASAM Exhibit Hall Closes
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    6:30 pm - 8:30 pm Ruth Fox Donors Reception (By Invitation Only)
    A Point of View (Restaurant), Top Floor

    Sponsored by:
    Tommie Lauer, MD
    Mark Seltzer, Esq., Seltzer & Associates, Philadelphia, PA
    Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Dorsey
    9:00 pm - 10:30 pm  ASAM Dessert and Coffee Reception
    Grand Ballroom West - Salons CD, Second Floor
    10:00 pm - 11:00 pm   Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor 

     


  • Saturday, April 21, 2012

    7:00 am - 8:00 am Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor
    7:00 am - 8:00 am Continental Breakfast - Exhibit Hall
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    7:00 am - 4:15 pm
    ASAM Exhibit Hall Open
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    7:00 am - 5:00 pm 
    Registration Desk Open
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor

    8:00 am - 9:30 am

    Policy Plenary - Grand Ballroom East - Ballroom AB, Second Floor
    Addressing Prescription Drug Abuse: Role of the Physician in Counteracting Diversion, Misuse & Addiction

    Council Chair:
    Herbert Malinoff, MD, FACP, DFASAM
    Committee Co-Chairs: Mark Kraus, MD, DFASAM; Scott Teitelbaum, MD, DFASAM
    Legislative Advocacy Committee Co-Chairs: A. Kenison Roy, III, MD, DFASAM; Kelly Clark, MD, MBA

    Plenary Keynote Speaker:
    Ileana Arias, PhD
    Ileana Arias, PhD
    Deputy Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Dr. Arias will speak about the public health impact of prescription drug abuse and overdose. She will present information on current trends in prescription drug abuse and overdose, highlight populations at greatest risk, and present CDC’s public health policy recommendations to addressing the prescription drug overdose epidemic.

    Plenary Panelists: Mark Kraus, MD, DFASAM; Scott Teitelbaum, MD, DFASAM; A. Kenison Roy, III, MD, DFASAM; Kelly Clark, MD, MBA

    Plenary Description: The last two decades have seen dramatic increases in the use of and addiction to potentially addictive pharmaceuticals. Although the non-medical use of prescription drugs is not a new phenomenon, increases in cases of diversion, misuse, and overdose deaths have been striking and have drawn the attention of public health officials, regulatory agencies, and public policy makers on the state and national level. This plenary will explore the role of the physician in counteracting prescription drug misuse and addiction.  In particular, the plenary will discuss ways that physicians can work with federal partners like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to stem the rising tide of prescription drug abuse in our country. 
     
    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of the plenary, attendees will:

    1. Understand federal and state public policies that affect the research, education, prevention and treatment efforts of addiction medicine practitioners.
    2. Gain a more intimate understanding of the practical implications of these policies on their work and on the lives of their colleagues, patients, and students.

    9:00 am - 10:00 am Ohio and New Jersey Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor
    9:30 am - 10:00 am Refreshment Break - Exhibit Hall
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level

    10:00 am - 12 noon - Concurrent Sessions

    Symposium 4 - Grand Salon West - Salon D, Second Floor
    An International Perspective on Combined Addiction and Mental Illness
    Co-Sponsored by: International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    Organizers: Marc Galanter, MD, DFASAM; Jag Khalsa, PhD.; Petros Levounis, MD, MA, DFASAM
    Speakers: Marc Galanter, MD,  DFASAM; Jag Khalsa, PhD; Steven W. Gust, PhD; Miguel Casas, MD; Giuseppe Carra, MD, PhD; Haim Mell, MD

    Symposium Description: In recent years, there has been remarkable growth internationally in innovative approaches to understand and treat substance use disorders.  Some of this relates to new modalities of treatment for the very same problems and disorders confronting American clinicians in the addiction field.  Other research studies have dealt with problems different from our own, but ones that shed light on the issues confronted in the American treatment community. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of the symposium, attendees will:

    1. Have an enhanced appreciation of the breadth of dual diagnosis issues found internationally, and
    2. Understand more about how they are manifest in three different national settings.

    Symposium 5 - Grand Salon East - Salon C, Second Floor
    The Epidemic of Accidental/Inadvertent Overdoses on Prescription Drugs
    Sponsored by: the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    Organizers: Wilson Compton, MD, MPE; Richard D. Ries, MD, DFASAM
    Speakers: Jody Rich, MD, MPH; Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH; Richard D. Ries, MD, DFASAM

     
    Description:  There are now more persons dying by overdose on prescription drugs than auto accidents in many stated, chiefly prescription opiated, often combined with other medications such as benzodiazepines.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Describe the epidemiology of this phenomenon.
    2. Identify interventional public health strategies to increase survival rates.

    Symposium 6 - Grand Salon East - Salon A, Second Floor
    Buprenorphine:  Enhancing Access While Preventing Diversion
    Sponsored by: The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  (CSAT/SAMHSA)

    Organizer and Chair:
    Sandrine Pirard, MD, PhD, MPH - Welcome and Overview

    Speakers:
    Richard C. Dart, MD, PhD - Trends in Buprenorphine Diversion 


    Michelle R. Lofwall, MD - Clinical Strategies for Enhancing Access While Preventing Diversion

    Jody Rich, MD, MPH - Motives for Diversion of Buprenorphine

    Description: This session discusses national trends, explores underlying motivation of users, reviews the national and international literature on Buprenorphine diversion, and explores associated risk factors, and provide recommendations to Buprenorphine providers. 

    Educational Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this session, the attendee will:

    Understand the implications of trend data and the published literature on Buprenorphine diversion

    1. Discuss motives associated with Buprenorphine diversion and assess patient risk factors for such nonmedical use.
    2. Adopt strategies to minimize diversion while enhancing medically appropriate access to Buprenorphine.

    Course 6 - Rooms 206-207, Second Floor
    Biology, Buddha and the Big Book

    Speakers: Charles Morgan, MD, DFASAM, FAAFP;  Stephanie Loebs, RN, BSN

    Description:  Biopsychosocial aspects of the disease of addiction based on tennents, philosophy and science will be explored.  Recent advances in science have supported basic principles that have been documented more recently in the original 12 step literature, as well as in ancient philosophical writings and some of those found in religious and spiritual writings.  In order to recover, the paths are many, but the truth is one.  The presenters will demonstrate how the science of addiction is confirming ancient beliefs and time tested principles of recovery.  Specific examples include such things as PET scan changes during anticipatory reward which correlates with the principle of avoiding people places and things; or new anatomical evidence for generation of new neuronal pathways correlating with the statement, "You can't think your way into sober living; you have to live your way into sober thinking."  Numerous other such correlations will be explored. Corresponding treatment for these symptoms will be correlated with the findings of basic science.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Be able to delineate basic scientific principles that support the principles of recovery that are found in 12 step programs and other spiritual programs.
    2. Have a vocabulary that they can use with both their colleagues and with their patients to discuss both spiritual principles of recovery and the scientific basis for those principles.
    3. Be able to describe certain characteristics of the disease of addiction, that lay people have long described (such as relapse occurs before use) and how this relates to science (for example anticipatory reward and corresponding changes in brain chemistry). 
    4. Have a skill set to help patients and their families embrace long term recovery.
    5. Have an understanding of how to help themselves and their staff members to be more enlightened practitioners and to help their patients be more self-actualized.

    Component Session 5 - Grand Salon West - Salon E, Second Floor
    State Medicaid Limitations on Buprenorphine: How to Fight Back

    Speakers: Mark Publicker, MD, DFASAM; Mark Kraus, MD, DFASAM; Eric Goplerud, PhD, MA; A. Thomas McLellan, PhD 

    Description: Buprenorphine is an essential medication for the treatment of opiate addiction.  Increasingly, state Medicaid programs are setting limitations on its use.  An important role of state ASAM Chapters is to oppose these limitations.  This component session will provide attendees with strategies for fighting limitations based on the Maine experience. Participants will receive documents used in the Maine, including important letters from ABAM, ASAM and Joint, as well as a review of the pertinent literature.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Understand the essential elements of treatment advocacy, including the role of leadership and perseverance in public policy committees, coordination with ASAM’s government relations department, the role of lobbyists and grassroots work by patients and families.

    Workshop 3 - Grand Salon East - Salon B, Second Floor
    Making 12-Step Programs Meaningful for Adolescents and Young Adults

    Speakers:  Steven Jaffe, MD;  Clint Stonebraker, CADC, CAC-2, CCS;  Matthew Meyer, CADC, CAC, CCS

    Description:  Making 12-Step Treatment developmentally meaningful for adolescents and young adults is an extremely important but challenging problem for all clinicians who work with this population. There is significant evidence of the effectiveness of adolescent participation in 12-Step groups which will be reviewed. Two approaches to solving this challenge will be presented. Modifying how the Steps are worked, using a Workbook format which is then presented at a group and the monitored assertive linking to 12-Step programs will be discussed. Conceptual and practical issues of a program of "enthusiastic sobriety" where participation is fun and exciting will be presented. Dealing with the difficult issue of spirituality will be included in these approaches.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of the workshop, participants will:

    1. Learn the research evidence for the effectiveness of adolescent participation in 12-Step Groups.
    2. Learn the use of a workbook format for adolescents to work their First and then next Four Steps.
    3. Learn the components involved in a 12-Step based treatment program which makes participation fun and exciting.
    4. Share their experience and approaches to these clinical problems.

    12:15 pm - 2:00 pm 

    2012 Awards Luncheon
    (Ticketed event - $65 per person, please purchase online or at the registration desk)
    Grand Ballroom East - Ballroom AB, Second Floor

    Awardees:

    Distinguished Scientist Lecture Award: Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM
    The John P. McGovern Award: David R. Gastfriend, MD
    Public Policy Award: A. Thomas McLellan, PhD
    Medical-Scientific Program Committee Award: J. Aaron Johnson, PhD
    ASAM Media Award: Bill & Judith Moyers
    Young Investigator Award: Anne Neumann, PhD, MA
    Annual Award: Elizabeth F. Howell, MD, DFAPA, DFASAM
    Annual Award: Gerald D. Shulman, MA, MAC, FACATA
    Presidential Award:Bonnie B. Wilford, MS
    Ruth Fox Scholarship: Dustin DeYoung, MD; Brian Harahan, MD, PhD; Karsten Lunze, MD, MPH;  Chinyere Ogbonna, MD, MPH; Joan M. Striebel, MD; Christen Tibbs, MD
    SAMHSA Science and Service Award:  Marc Fishman, MD; Patricia Pade, MD; Joseph O. Merrill MD, MPH; Amanda Wilson, MD


    2:00 pm - 4:00 pm - Concurrent Sessions

    Symposium 7 - Grand Salon East - Salon A, Second Floor
    Review of Treatment of Co-occurring Disorders in Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenic Disorders - The ASAM Clinician's Role
    Sponsored by: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    Organizers: Richard D.Ries, MD, DFASAM; Wilson Compton, MD, MPE, 
    Speakers: Edward V. Nunes, Jr, MD; Kevin P. Hill, MD, MHS; Richard Ries, MD, DFASAM; Joan Ellen Zweben, PhD

    Description:  Rate of substance disorders are increased two to five times in depression, bipolar and schizophrenic disorders, and such patients present challenges around diagnosis, psychosocial and medication strategies. This review will focus on the unique role which the ASAM clinician may have in these areas.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Understand and be able to apply screening criteria to assess for Depression, Bipolar, and Schizophrenic disorders in their clinical addiction treatment populations.
    2. Understand and be able to integrate psychosocial and medication treatments for patients with the above COD's in addiction treatment.
    3. Understand and be able to prescribe appropriate medications to patients who have the above COD's with regards to both addictions treatments and addictions treatment medications.

    Symposium 8 - Grand Salon East - Salon C, Second Floor
    Medical Conditions and Opiates Agonist Treatment

    Organizers: Judith Martin, MD, DFASAM; Daniel P. Alford, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM
    Speakers: Shehzad Basaria, MD; Mori J. Krantz, MD, FACC, FACP; Karen Miotto, MD; Diana Sylvestre, MD; Alexander Walley, MD, MSc
    Symposium Description: Opioid addiction and opioid agonist treatment can be associated with medical conditions related to needle use, and medical conditions related to long-term opioid treatment. This Symposium presents current clinical information related to some of these medical issues.


    Shehzad Basaria, MD:
     Opioid-induced Hypogonadism
    Mori J. Krantz, MD, FACC, FACP: ECG Screening and Cardiac Risk Mitigation in an Urban OTP
    Karen Miotto, MD Sleep Apnea in Opioid Agonist Treatment
    Diana Sylvestre, MD: Update on Hepatitis C Treatment
    Alexander Walley, MD, MSc: Update on HIV/AIDS: Prevention and Treatment in Patients on Opioid Agonist Treatment.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Use current knowledge about hepatitis C and HIV in screening and treatment decisions.
    2. Learn the infrastructure requirements for starting an ECG screening program in an urban OTP
    3. Develop ways to address hypogonadism in OAT patients.
    4. Be informed on current research on sleep apnea and opioids.

    Symposium 9 - Grand Salon West - Salon E, Second Floor
    Screening and Brief Interventions of Adolescents and Young Adults in General Medical Settings: Scientific Updates and Clinical Implications
    Sponsored by: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

    Organizers: Geetha Subramanian, MD; Norman W. Wetterau, MD, FAAP, DFASAM  
    Speakers: John Knight, MD; Constance Weisner, DrPH, MSW; Fredric Blow, PhD, Mary Larimer, PhD

    Description:  Epidemiologic research evidence shows that the use of substances such as tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and misuse of prescription medications among adolescents and young adults are high and in some cases rising.  Early onset of abuse of these substances leads to persistent and worsening of substance use disorders in adulthood which supports early identification and intervention of problem use. Empirical evidence for the efficacy and tools for Screening and Brief intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for youth presenting at medical settings is now emerging.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Understand the outcomes from behavioral medicine specialists in pediatric primary care providing adolescents brief interventions and referral to treatment.
    2. Understand the impact of computerized screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use and abuse among adolescents treated in low-income primary care settings, including Federally Qualified Health Centers.
    3. Be able to begin using evidence based methods to identify and help their adolescent patients overcome substance use problems.

    Symposium 10 - Grand Salon West - Salon D, Second Floor
    Prenatal Care and Neonatal Withdrawal Approaches in Opiate Dependence

    Organizers: Alfonso Paredes, MD; Jag Khalsa, PhD 
    Speakers: Karol Kaltenbach, PhD; Martha Velez, PhD; Sara Heil, PhD

    Description: Currently methadone maintenance is considered to be the treatment of choice for heroin-addicted women. Such approach is believed to facilitate compliance with prenatal care, reportedly it leads to better infant outcomes, helps to reduce the risk of HIV infection and makes possible to prepare the mother for the assumption of parenting responsibilities.

    Recent trends in the epidemiology of opiate use require attention given to the increasingly large group of opiate dependent women who are addicted to prescription opiates like oxycodone, hydrocodone and codeine. These medications have become the fastest rising category of abused drugs. Many pregnant women may be consuming these substances increasing the numbers of expecting mothers who carry a significant amount of opiates in their system. 

    Current clinical practices seem to imply that prolonged exposure of opioids to the unborn is relatively safe and that the risks to the neonate are relatively minor. However, it should also be considered that this exposure occurs during critical periods of neural development.

    Throughout the intrauterine period brain cells in the fetus are evolving from stem cell precursors some differentiating to neurons and neuroglia development is taking place. Immature neurons are migrating from initial locations to final positions. At the same time there is a remarkable outgrowth of axons and dendrites.

    Does the presence of opiates or, for that matter the presence of other drugs of abuse and their metabolites as well as therapeutic drugs such as antidepressants lead to morphological and functional vulnerabilities that may become apparent during later states of development? It has been claimed that babies exposed to opiates in uterus have a “slightly higher rate of birth defects including, congenital heart defects, and glaucoma and spine bifida.” Although the confounding effects of smoking, alcohol and poverty have not been ruled out, these issues deserve attention. It is known that exposure to alcohol in the mother’s internal environment is not harmless; may this be the case with other substances including several of the psychiatric medications? Resent research has raised some concern regarding antidepressant use during pregnancy.

    From the perspective of clinical experience, neonatal opiate withdrawal syndromes are often observed among the neonates of mothers receiving opiates. The usual medical approaches to manage these syndromes require review and perhaps update. The empirical validation of safety and effectiveness also deserves close attention. The type of opiates to which the unborn is exposed may be predictive of risk.  There are short acting and long acting opiates, some are agonist/antagonist.  The newborn from mothers on buprenorphine have been reported to require significantly less medication after delivery and spend less time in the hospital than babies whose mother was on methadone.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this Symposium, attendees will:

    1. Review practices and guiding principles if the prenatal care of opiate dependent women who are receiving substitution therapy opiates.
    2. What are the criteria that should be applied to consider permissible breastfeeding.

    Course 7 - Rooms 204-205, Second Floor
    Setting Up an Addiction Medicine Fellowship

    Speakers: Petros Levounis, MD, MA, DFASAM;  Paul Rinaldi, PhD; Abigail J. Herron, DO; Launette Rieb, MSc, MD, CCFP, FCFP

    Description:  With the founding of the American Board of Addiction Medicine in 2007 and the accreditation of the first 10 fellowships in Addiction Medicine in 2011, the question of how to best prepare our fellow physicians who are not psychiatrists for the challenges and rewards of a career in addiction medicine has come to the forefront of graduate medical education. This workshop will focus on (a) logistics of setting up a fellowship in Addiction Medicine (funding, recruiting, rotations, didactics, documentation), and (b) best practices in the clinical training of general physicians who want to specialize in Addiction Medicine.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Organize an Addiction Medicine fellowship.
    2. Recognize training opportunities, challenges, and limitations in the current landscape of organized addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine.
    3. Critically evaluate different options for the addiction training of non-psychiatric physicians

    Course 8 - Rooms 206-207, Second Floor
    Adolescent Substance Use: Addressing America's #1 Public Health Problem

    Speakers: Emily Feinstein, JD; Sharon Levy, MD, MPH; Martha Wunsch, MD, FAAP, DFASAM; Eric Goplerud, PhD, MA, BA

    Description:  Adolescent substance use is the largest preventable and most costly health problem in America: 46.1 percent of high school students are current users of addictive substances and 11.9 percent of high school students have a clinical substance use disorder which often co-occurs with other health problems.  Adolescent substance use can be addressed with evidence-based interventions that prevent use or interrupt the progression from risky use to addiction, and adolescent addictive disorders can be treated and managed effectively.  These interventions, however, are not part of routine medical practice and only about 6 percent of those who need treatment receive it.    Barriers health care providers face in addressing adolescent substance use include a lack of: 1) knowledge about adolescent substance use and addictive disorders; 2) knowledge of tools for screening and brief interventions, and uncertainty of what to do upon a positive screen; 3) familiarity with reimbursement options for coverage; 4) time given current reimbursement policies; and 5) quality specialty care.    This session will fill these gaps in knowledge and discuss barriers to expanded attention to adolescent substance use in medical practice and how these barriers can be overcome. Experts in substance use research, pediatrics, medical education and health care financing will demonstrate how substance use can be managed in health care practice in the same manner as other adolescent health conditions. The workshop will equip participants with tools for substance use prevention and early intervention and help them understand how developments in medical education and health insurance can facilitate positive change. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, participants will:

    1. Understand the critical importance of addressing adolescent substance use in medical practice.
    2. Know how to access tools to address adolescent substance use as part of routine care.
    3. Identify resources for expanded education and training on the topic.
    4. Know how to take advantage of insurance provisions and billing codes to obtain reimbursement for services.

    Workshop 4 - Grand Salon East - Salon B, Second Floor
    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and Substance Abuse Treatment: What Healthcare Providers Need to Know

    Speakers: Jinhee J. Lee, PharmD; Sandrine Pirard, MD, PhD, MPH

    Description: Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) are statewide programs that collect data on various controlled substance prescriptions and enable prescribers, pharmacists, regulatory boards and law enforcement agencies (under certain restrictions) to access this information pursuant to applicable State guidelines. Additionally, PDMPs may aid the care of those patients with chronic, untreated pain or chemical dependency and help to identify patients engaged in prescription drug abuse and diversion. To date, forty-eight states and one US territory have enacted PDMP legislation. Thirty-six states have operational PDMPs and some are planning on becoming operational in 2011.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this workshop, attendees will:

    1. Provide an overview of PDMPs.
    2. Present PDMPs as an additional tool in the management of patients with substance-related disorders.
    3. Help healthcare providers take advantage of this tool while understanding the limitations of the current system and confidentiality restrictions.

    3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Physicians Health Committee
    Room 209, Second Floor

    4:00 pm - 6:00 pm - Concurrent Sessions

    Component Session 6 - Rooms 206-207, Second Floor 

    What is Tested on the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) Certification Exam: How the Core Content of Addiction Medicine will be Reflected in the Examination Blueprint

    Speakers: Michael Weaver, MD, DFASAM; Martha Wunsch, MD, FAAP, DFASAM; Patrick O' Connor,  MD, MPH;  Christina  Delos Reyes, MD; Margaret A. E. Jarvis, MD, Terri Silver, MA 

    Description:  The format will be interactive: brief presentations on ABAM certification, eligibility requirements to sit for the examination, and changes that will be reflected in the examination blueprint, with time in each segment for participants to pose questions on issues that are important to them. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will: 

    ABAM is revising the Examination Blueprint for 2012 based on the Scope of Practice, Core Content, and Compendium of Educational Objectives. ABAM also continues to expand the processes for certifying and maintaining certification for addiction medicine specialists.  Component Session participants will learn about recent developments and future plans for the Examination Blueprint, and how these affect current and future certified physicians. Component Session participants will gain an understanding of the History of Certification in Addiction Medicine. 

    1. Understand the ABAM Certification Eligibility Requirements, and Application process.
    2. Understand the impact of the Scope of Practice, Core Content, and Compendium
    3. Understand the Educational Objectives on the Examination Blueprint.
    4. Understand Preparation and Review for the Examination.

    4:15 pm  Exhibit Hall Closes
    Galleria Exhibit Hall, Lower Level
    4:15 pm - 5:15 pm Primary Care Interest Group Meeting
    Room 208, Second Floor
    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Ruth Fox Endowment Scholarship Meeting
    Room 214, Second Floor
    6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Massachusetts Chapter Meeting
    Room 201, Second Floor
    10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor

     


  • Sunday, April 22, 2012

    7:00 am - 8:00 am Mutual Help
    Room 214, Second Floor
    7:00 am - 8:00 am  Continental Breakfast
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor
    7:00 am - 12 noon  Registration Desk Open
    2nd Floor Pre-Function Foyer, Second Floor 

    8:00 am - 10:00 am - Concurrent Sessions

    Symposium 11 - Grand Salon West - Salon D, Second Floor
    Emerging Drugs: Synthetic Cannabinoids and Substituted Cathinones

    Organizers: Gavin Bart, MD, FACP, DFASAM; Michael Fingerhood, MD, FACP
    Speakers: Matthew W. Johnson, PhD; Elizabeth H. Crane, PhD, MPH; Erik Gunderson, MD

    Description: This symposium will focus on the rapidly evolving area of new synthetic cannabinoids (K2, Spice, etc.) and substituted cathinones (“bath salts”). Four main areas of focus will allow the attendee to develop a general understanding of the pharmacology, clinical manifestations, epidemiological features, and regulatory issues surrounding these emerging drugs.

    Elizabeth Crane, PhD, MPH will present national data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network on emergency room encounters with synthetic cannabinoids. She will also discuss how the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and other federal agencies are attempting to detect and track the rapidly evolving area of emerging drugs.

    Matthew Johnson, PhD  will describe the pharmacology of emerging drugs and how they are similar to and different from their traditional counterparts. Their mechanism of action as well as rewarding and reinforcing properties will also be discussed.

    Erik Gunderson, MD will present his research findings from clinical surveys on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids and substituted cathinones and their potential for cross-tolerance with their more traditional counterparts. 

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this symposium, attendees will:

    1. Learn the pharmacological properties of synthetic cannabinoids and substituted cathinones with the goal of understanding their rewarding and reinforcing properties.
    2. Learn the about recent developments in the Federal regulations on precursor chemicals, analogs, the manufacturing, and distribution of emerging drugs.
    3. Learn the scope and characteristics of recent Drug Abuse Warning Network emergency center reports of emerging drug encounters and how epidemiologists are attempting to keep up with this rapidly evolving area.
    4. Learn about clinical characteristics of synthetic cannabinoids and substituted cathinones use and their potential for cross-tolerance with their more traditional counterparts.

    Course 9 - Rooms 204-205, Second Floor 

    What the Beginner Should Know about Traumatic Brain Injury and Addictions

    Speaker: R. Jeffrey Goldsmith, MD, DFASAM

    Description:  Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common co-occurring phenomenon with people suffering from addictions.  There are basic points to help you identify TBI, assess it, make a comprehensive treatment plan, and collaborate with the healthcare providers. The beginner addiction professional will feel more confident participating in the care of someone with a TBI who also has an addiction syndrome.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. The importance of knowing the common occurrence of Traumatic Brain Injury and how it happens.
    2. The language of assessment is different from routine addiction terminology and needs to be understood before entering a clinical discussion.
    3. Treatment plans may include interventions not common in the basic treatment plan for people with addictions.  They need to be considered for optimal recovery.
    4. Several healthcare givers are common in treating TBI patients who may not be familiar to the addictionologist.  There are certain guidelines to enhance this collaboration and provide the optimal treatment plan.

    Course 10 - Rooms 206-207, Second Floor
    Advanced Urine Toxicology Testing

    Speakers: Peter L. Tenore, MD, DFASAM

    Description:  Standard urine toxicology testing enzymatic immunoassays (EIAs) can identify class of drug used but are ineffective at identifying which specific drug is present. Drug treatment patient may abuse heroin or Xanax but attribute positive urine EIAs to legitimate prescriptions. Ativan, Klonopin, Oxycontin, and Fentanyl patients should have mostly negative (not positive as most providers think) urine EIAs.  Only advanced testing with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy can sort these cases out.

     

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Understand the faults and limitations with common urine EIA toxicology testing.
    2. Appreciate when and how to utilize advanced GC/MS testing in clinical practice to exonerate those accused of diversion and to identify (to help) those abusing drugs who attribute toxicology results to prescribed medications. Learn the different mechanisms of routine urine toxicology EIA testing and the mechanism of advanced Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy.

    Component Session 7 - Grand Salon East - Salon B, Second Floor 
    Performance Measures and Addiction Medicine
    ASAM's Practice Improvement and Performance Measures Action Group (PIPMAG)

    Speakers: Michael M. Miller, MD, FAPADFASAM; Mady Chalk, PhD, Diane Stollenwerk, MPP

    Description:  A presentation on current national efforts to develop performance measures for patients with substance use disorders and the implications for ASAM’s efforts to develop standards and performance measures for addiction medicine.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Gain knowledge about the Washington Circle Report on Performance Measures for SUD in Primary Care;
    2. NQF Framework on multiple chronic conditions; and
    3. ASAM’s plans to develop standards of care and performance measures for addiction medicine.

    10:00 am - 12 noon - Concurrent Sessions

     
    Course 11 - Rooms 204-205, Second Floor
    Using Medications to Assist in Recovery from Opioid Dependence: The Role of Naltrexone

    Speakers:  Adam Bisaga, MD; Edward Nunes, MD;  Joshua Lee, MD, MSc;  Marc Fishman, MD, DFASAM

    Description:  While agonist maintenance remains a treatment of choice for patients with opioid dependence, naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, offers an alternative approach, suitable for patients who are not interested in agonist maintenance, those who have failed prior trials, and patients who are interested in discontinuing agonist maintenance but remain at risk for relapse. This workshop will help clinicians adopt naltrexone in the variety of practice settings such as primary care, adolescent medicine, and psychiatry. Covered topics include selection of candidates for naltrexone treatment, clinical strategies to initiate treatment in active users, safety concerns and management of side effects, and addressing clinical problems emerging during long-term maintenance treatment with naltrexone.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this course, attendees will:

    1. Recognize which types of patients are most likely to benefit from opioid antagonist vs. agonist therapy.
    2. Learn about the methods of inducting patients onto naltrexone.
    3. Learn about behavioral therapy platforms to assist in maintaining patients on naltrexone.
    4. Learn about strategies that can be adopted in the variety of practice settings.

    Component Session 8 - Rooms 206-207, Second Floor
    The American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and Maintenance of Certification. Our Role in the Movement towards Improved Quality of Care

    Speakers: Gavin Bart, MD, FACP, DFASAM;  Robert Sokol, MD;  A. Kenison Roy, III, MD, DFASAM;  Lon Hays, MD, MBA, DFAPA;  Martha Wunsch, MD, FAAP, DFASAM;  Lia Bennett, MPH;  Michael Weaver, MD, DFASAM 

    Description: The format will be interactive: Presentations on the role of ABAM's Maintenance of Certification Program in the Quality Care Movement, and the four Components of ABAM's Maintenance of Certification Program, Professional Standing and Licensure Verification, Life Long Learning and Self-Assessment, the Cognitive Examination, and Practice Performance Assessment, with time in each segment for participants to pose questions on issues that are important to them.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will understand that:

    1. ABAM is expanding the processes of maintaining certification for addiction medicine specialists, in order to meet the ABMS requirements for recognition of addiction medicine as a medical specialty, and to improve the quality of care to patients. Component Session participants will learn about recent developments and future plans of ABAMs MOC Program, and how these affect current and future certified physicians. Component Session participants will gain an understanding of:
    2. The Quality Care Movement and the Public Trust Initiative and the History of Maintenance of Certification and its role in the Quality Care Movement; Understanding of the value and benefits of Maintenance of Certification and The requirements for Component I-IV, Professional Standing and Verification of Licensure, Life Long Learning and Self-Assessment, Cognitive Expertise, as well as the future plans for Component IV of the ABAM Maintenance of Certification, Practice Performance Assessment.  Understanding of The future of Maintenance of Certification.

    Component Session 9 - Grand Salon East - Salon B, Second Floor
    Town Meeting on the ASAM Criteria Revision (PPC)

    Speakers: David Mee-Lee, MD;  David Gastfriend, MD

    Description:  This Component Session provides the opportunity for questions, discussion and feedback on the Revision of the ASAM Criteria.  This will be a Town Meeting format to allow maximum input.

    Educational Objectives:
    At the end of this session, attendees will:

    1. Review the current state of ASAM Patient Placement Criteria.
    2. Identify key areas for input and feedback in the ASAM Criteria revision process.
    3. Discuss areas for improvement in the ASAM Criteria to better implement and apply the Criteria.